Other Free Encyclopedias » Social Issues Reference » Child Development Reference - Vol 7 » Single-Parent Families - The Prevalence Of Single-parent Families In America, The Well-being Of Children Raised In Single-parent Homes

Single-Parent Families - The Well-being Of Children Raised In Single-parent Homes

mothers economic parenting experience

When compared to their peers from traditional two-parent homes, children raised in single-parent homes are at risk for a number of less desirable outcomes. Such outcomes include both lower academic performance and a higher incidence of behavioral problems. It would be a mistake to conclude, however, that such negative outcomes were the direct consequence of the number of parents in the home or, as has been suggested on occasion, the absence of a father figure in a child's life. Instead, children are adversely affected by circumstances that co-occur with single-parent family configurations (such as economic disadvantage, residential instability, and interparental conflict) or are the consequence of such configurations (such as disrupted parenting). Such circumstances are not uniformly present in the lives of all single-parent families. Consequently, children from different types of single-parent families are at differential risk for adverse outcomes associated with their living arrangements.

A greater percentage of single-parent families (57.4% in 1999) than two-parent families (6.3%) live below the poverty line. The percentage of single-parent families below the poverty line is highest for adolescent single mothers and lowest for widowed mothers. In addition, a higher percentage of single mothers than single fathers lives below the poverty line. Economic disadvantage is linked with lower academic achievement and increased behavioral problems among children. Fewer economic resources are also linked with residential instability, which further contributes to children's academic and behavioral difficulties. Differences in well-being for children from single-parent families versus two-parent families typically disappear when differences in economic circumstances are taken into account.

Families that attain their single-parent status through marital dissolution are disproportionately more likely to experience both residential instability and higher rates of interparental conflict (both prior and subsequent to marital disruption). Children who are exposed to interparental conflict are more likely to experience difficulties with regard to psychological and behavioral adjustment and academic achievement. Again, once levels of interparental conflict are taken into account, differences in well-being for children from single-parent families versus two-parent families are reduced.

Finally, children from all family types are at risk when they experience parenting that is inadequate in terms of warmth, control, or monitoring. Less than optimal parenting is more likely to be observed in families that are experiencing economic stress and among adolescent mothers (although a large part of this association may be explained by the greater likelihood that adolescent single mothers will experience economic disadvantage). Psychologist Mavis Hetherington has found that the parenting skills of mothers tend to diminish in the years immediately following divorce, and children who are exposed to such disruptions in parenting experience concurrent psychological, behavioral, and academic difficulties. As mothers adjust to their new single-parent status, however, their parenting improves, as does their children's well-being.

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over 4 years ago

I am going to turn the tables slightly. I am a 35 year old single father of a beautiful 4 year old little girl. She is already in school and she is doing very well. I do have full custody of her and I permit her mother to see her or call her anytime. Her mother never visits her daughter more than once a week nor call morethan twice a week. My daughter and I are doing fine. Howvere, when my daughter comes to me and says that her mommy is a bad mommy, I have to find answers. I would never leave my child. How can people just turn away? Especially a mother. I am not cutting slack for fathers. There are alot of deadbeat dad's out there. I would just like some feedback. I dont understand. I am a man that takes care of his responsibilities. Work, school, but always a dad first.

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almost 4 years ago

It dosent matter rather mom or dad a good parent is a good parent. Just because you live with both dosent mean your going to be better than the child living with one parent.

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about 4 years ago

I am a 39 year old father of a 4 yr old beautiful little girl. her mother passed away when she was two and half yrs,her mother and I always wondered why she was more connected to me than to her. Now I understand that it was God's plan because he new he was going to seperate them.It was very difficult for me at first but now I am enjoying it, I do get support from my family and relatives. I would like to ask the world to be more supportive of single fathers and make constructive comments. Some ladies ask me if I don't see it as being inappropriate to raise a girl alone,we can not forget about our baby girls because some monsters are abusing their own kids. It is my responsibility to raise my child with love. If we can do it so can you.

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about 5 years ago

This was very interesting, but what are the studies of women who went to college and have a career and a home of their own with no man involved? I am a 23 year old mother of three with a degree in social work and still furthering my education. I work for the government as a social worker making $23 an hour I have a house not an apartment and a car. my children are 2,3 and 4 years old and are all in school (early head start) and are marked as the top 5 students in the school. so all 3 children are very smart and we did all this without a dad or man present in the house hold so what does you study say about my situation.

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over 4 years ago

Jeff... I completely understand where you're coming from. I'm a 46 year old single dad of 2 boys ages 4 and 6. Mom left without even trying to keep the children. She has 2 other boys from 2 other dads and the dads raised them from the time those boys were babies also. Mom now lives out of state and calls the boys about every 2 weeks and sees them 5-6 weeks a year during summer. I know that it will be tough on the boys growing up without a mom. All the school stuff is attended by grandma and mother's day, they just feel left out. How can anyone just leave their kids? Sorry, I don't have an answer for that.

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over 3 years ago

How do i site this info in MLA formate?????

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over 4 years ago

I was raised in a single parent household from age 9. I definitely see the difference and wouldn't wish it on any kid. Although I managed to be successful, I went through many struggles. It is easy for a parent to feel that raising a child in a single family home is ok because they are not the child. Children can go to college and do anything another child can do, but a lot of time we suffer emotionally and miss that other parent. All in all I am proud of my Mom and think that she did the best she could do, but I would have suffered less emotionally having a two parent household.

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about 5 years ago

I am a 35 yr old single parent of three boys (16, 14 & 8). My boys are all very well mannered. I haven't had any problems with them in school acedemically. They are all the top of their class and has been since starting school. My parents are married and have been together since high school. I believe that the outcome of your children, being a single parent, starts from when they are young. If you instill in them at a young age the way they are to be, then as they get older it'll stick. You HAVE to be the PARENT and not the FRIEND, ALWAYS. This has been my method & I am very proud of the outcome. I tought them to be a Leader rather then a Follower in any group at all times. Their peers look up to and respect them , as they emulate my boys (Leaders).

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about 2 years ago

Your research have been very helpful. I must say that growing up with both parents have its advantages as well as its disadvantages also, especially where both parents do not always agree on certain things.Children who come from a stable home with both parents tend to be very self-sufficient in oppose to those who come from unstable homes. So too are those who come from single -parenting.As a single parent I provide financially for my children of two, (now 17 and 27). I provide a stable home. Teaching them to be responsible and be empathetic, recognizing their needs from their wants. I also teach them to be responsible by allowing them to contribute to specific things of interest in the home. thus, building strong bonds by spending quality time on a one-on-one. Don't get me wrong, single-parenting is hard due to the fact you are the sole provider.

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over 3 years ago

Not everyone with a single parent is poor.

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almost 4 years ago

Single-Parent Families - The Well-being Of Children Raised In Single-parent Homes

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over 4 years ago

My name is Desiree and I'm 14 years old. I'm raised in a single-parent home, but unlike other children I'm raised by my grandmother. I first started living with my grandma when I was about 11, and it was very hard to coupe with. I learned to adjust to the lifestyle, but it is still hard not having my parents around although i see them frequently. I also have a little brother who is 11 now. I see how hard it is for him to live under these conditions and I feel bad, because I know how he feels and I wish that I could make a better life for him. I know I cant't do that now but I hope to in the future, or have my parents step up and take charge again. It's hard coming from a single-parent home, and it's not always easy to deal with all the situations. I just stay close to God and pray everything will be okay

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over 1 year ago

dis a shame

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about 1 month ago

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over 1 year ago

Whether someone is a single-parent or not it is still everyone's responsibility to make sure the children in this country get a quality education. Also, someone a child, teen, or young adult can admire as a mentor for the future if the parents are not involved because of work. One solution we have been afraid of is communicating with children in our own neighborhoods that are in single-parent households because we are afraid individuals (who think highly of ourselves).

God bless us!

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over 2 years ago

my daughter mother gave me full custody of my teen daugther i want all of my daughet documents and i have proof what my daughter was doing when she was living with her mom her mother wont give her birth certificate etc,what i should about this and also i have a letter from her mother that she gave full custody

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over 2 years ago

Rebecca,
google son of a machine, click the first link, click MLA on the left side, click Web document, then fill in what spaces you can, that's what i do ^.^ hope i helped

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over 2 years ago

Single-Parent Families - The Well-being Of Children Raised In Single-parent Homes

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over 2 years ago

Ok i'm a 32 year old mother of 3 beautiful daughter (ok i am biased, I am blessed in raising my daughters by myself, I don't have much support and yeah it's hard. My oldest daughter who is 15 (nearly 16) is on here way. She has been through hell and back with me but going to succeed, Yeah we struggle with money but we are rich in many other ways. Dad isn't in their lives (was told 2 can't see dad and one well her dad wont be involved. I have to do my best and by studying and continueing and learning about my life my girls see this. My youngest have 2 role models to look up to their mum and big sister. Hopefully one lesson they can learn is to learn, education consideration, and manners get you a long way. finger crossed and good luck to you all!! xo

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over 3 years ago

Darren, From what you've posted, I would take her to court and fight for your deserved visitation rights. If she's bringing up personal stuff that does not and has not affected the kids, the judge most likely will not allow it (which is why her lawyer probably never brought it up). Courts aren't interested in your personal problems with each other, generally, they're interested in what's in the best interest of the kids. The mediator's report which will be admissible will go a long way. The judge will see that a 3rd party has already determined that you should get more visitation. The courts will be reluctant to go against this recommendation unless there is new evidence presented, which is unlikely because her evidence has no bearing on the parenting issues.



Good luck and never quit. The kids deserve to have both parents a part of their lives.

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almost 4 years ago

hi

im a teenager at the age of 16 and i completely disagree with this article ive been brought up in single parent environment and i might add that we have always had a place to live that has satisfied us yes we have moved but only to get out of our old house only cause the area wasn't very nice.

my mum has raised me and my older brother and sister to be the best we can be in society and we have always had what every other ordinary nuclear family had, its really what you make of the situation yer you got divorced but be strong for your children's sake satisfy your well-being and your own before anything else its always about the decisions you make.

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almost 4 years ago

My wife and I are currently going through a divorce. She admits that I am a fantastic father to our children, but as a personal vendetta she is trying to allow me only minimum allowable custody by Utah law - every other weekend and 1 mid-week visit. We went to mediation 3 weeks ago and agreed to give me about twice as much parent time - I was ecstatic. I told the kids the next day and THEY were super ecstatic. My (still)wife then backed out of the mediated agreement and started this minimum allowable time nonsense. It is destroying our kids confidence and is (I can tell) always on their mind. My (still)wife says she did it for the children so they can have consistency, but I found a document she sent to her lawyer outlining details from our past ( not regarding the kids at all) which were not brought up in mediation and she ended up firing her lawyer because of it. The poor kids are being put through all of this because she is trying to hurt me. She has no perspective - what should I do?

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almost 4 years ago

I am 26 and am a single mom of a 19month old going to college and am writing a paper on how much harder it is to be a single parent. Some reasearch I have found that people that come from two parent homes arent single parents so let me know

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over 4 years ago

I am a single mother of a 3 year old girl. She is the best thing that ever happened to me. She saved my life in so many ways and for that i am greatfull. She has every thing she wants and needs. I am trying my hardest to teach her good moral standards and everything else she needs to know. Although it is not easy I will not ever give up. I give her father the chance to spend what ever time he wants with her and let her form her own oppenions because I feel that is important. Although sigle parenting is hard and it would be more benifical for her to be in a two parent home I wouldnt change what I have for the world. I love my daughter dearly and we have that unbreakable bond. To those who are also single parents GOD BLESS YOU. The rewards of unconditional love are worth it.

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over 4 years ago

I am a 36 yr old female with a 19yr & 15 yr old daughter. I am a single parent working a full-time job for the State & going to school pursuing my degree for RN. My 19 yr old is currently in college & my 15 yr old will be in college in 2011. I did it all while being a single parent. Never had to rely on the government for assistance even though I was a teen parent. I have the uptmost respect for all single parents because it's not easy but we get it done and raise well mannered, smart children. Just because our children are raised in one parent households does not mean they don't acheive the same standards or even better standards that the 2 parent household.

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over 4 years ago

Growing up in a family of 11 my mom was a single mom. She struggled from time to time to make ends meat.We were never given the things that we wanted, just the things that we needed. Out of the 11, only 2 have yet to graduate high school. The rest felt neglected and unloved. Therefore, they turned to the streets. This led them to doing bad thins and made my mom feel like she failed as a mother.

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almost 5 years ago

i am a student and am glad that i have read these issues pertaining to single parenting.Nonetheless i need help on a project that i am working on right now, the topic is Causes Of Single Parenting And their Effects on Children.therefore i need research questions for my topic to guide me when researching. if you can assist me please.

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about 5 years ago

Hi I am a single parent with an intelligent 12 year old who remains on AB Honor roll. I am irritated how indiiduals think children from single parent households are incapable of achieving anything as those raised in a two parent household.

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over 5 years ago

Thankyou so much. Despite all these, why do we still have the

high prevalence for single parent families? is there any good that comes along with it?

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over 5 years ago

This was helpful information. I think that economic constraints and the psycho-social consequences that often follow a divorce or break-up are defiitely the two most influential factors that can have a negative impact on raising a child in a single parent household. I am happy that women are earning college degrees and higher earning potentials at ever increasing rates. As far as the psycho-social impact of ending a relationship goes, women need to stay focused on the children and be strong for them as time heals all.

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over 5 years ago

I think that this information was great, except for the fact that all studies seem to show a single parent home to be divorced, widowed, or a young teenage girl. Well what about a mother with degrees that was walked out on and is now a single mother? Does the outcome still look the same. Is poverty still the end result, or is there another study all together?

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over 5 years ago

It is easy to say that single parent mothers are at an economic disadvantage as long as child support is not included into the mothers income. This "exclusion" of these funds is biased and another example of "lieing by omission" a criminal error in thinking.

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almost 6 years ago

thank you so much, this material has been so helpful.